Available courses

This course is designed as a study of the growth and development of children, specifically from birth to age eight. It examines factors that influence growth and development, and the major developmental theories to explain how growth and development occur, i.e. psycho-social, physical, moral, and cognitive development, including language acquisition theories for young children. Student teachers gain knowledge of the developmental differences that occur throughout these domains to enable them to plan activities for children in the same age range, but at different stages of development. Lastly, it offers a brief introduction of observation, assessment, and documentation of children’s behaviors and learning. As a requirement, candidates engage in five hours clinical experience: one hour observation in a preschool setting, and four hours observing a child.

Implementing the ECE Curriculum

(16-week course; face-to-face mid-term of
semester) – Dr. Sharon Hundley & Ms. Rita Curtis

ECE 190:Assessment and Evaluation (16-week course; face-to-face mid-term of semester) Dr.
Sharon Hundley & Ms. Rita Curtis

Language Development in Early Years (8-week course, fully online – 1 st bi-term) Dr.
Jeffrey Herron & Dr. Ellen Hamilton-Ford

This course identifies the characteristics of exceptional children, the effects of their exceptionality on the developmental domains, and an understanding of the implications of teaching this population of students. Exceptionalities to study include: learning disabilities, ADHD, emotional and behavior disorders, intellectual and developmental disabilities, speech and language disorders, autism spectrum disorder, deafness and hearing loss, visual impairments, other health impairments, comorbidity, and gifted and talented children. The course includes strategies to build relationships with families and Belizean organizations such as the National Resource Center for Inclusive Education (NaRCIE) and the Belize Council for the Visually Impaired (BCVI). It also offers an introduction to the Universal Instructional Design approach. As a requirement, candidates participate in a two-hour clinical experience. They conduct a one- hour observation and then prepare and implement a lesson plan for a whole-group interaction with children in a school for exceptional children setting.

This course encompasses guided observations and participation in preschools and lower division primary classrooms. The student-teachers participate in lesson planning and deliver lessons in the actual EC classroom while developing a professional portfolio. The course also offers an exploration of the roles, responsibilities, and challenges associated with being a teacher of young children. Student teachers will participate in a preparatory seminar/workshop to understand the professional requirements and scheduling for the practicum course. During this practicum, student teachers will be provided opportunities to develop and test relationship building strategies with children, interact with relevant school curricular, select, plan and teach lesson unit, critique observations, give and receive feedback in peer groups, video tape teaching episodes, engage in constant self-analysis, and peer feedback as a way of evaluating individual progress. Student teachers submit weekly journals including documentation of peer group meetings, responses to observations, and receive ongoing interactive feedback to further increase their knowledge and skills in earlychildhood pedagogical practices.  These strategies will help the student teachers to become better competent reflective teachers.

This course is designed as a study of the growth and development of children, specifically from birth to age eight. It examines factors that influence growth and development, and the major developmental theories to explain how growth and development occur, i.e. psycho-social, physical, moral, and cognitive development, including language acquisition theories for young children. Student teachers gain knowledge of the developmental differences that occur throughout these domains to enable them to plan activities for children in the same age range, but at different stages of development. Lastly, it offers a brief introduction of observation, assessment, and documentation of children’s behaviors and learning. As a requirement, candidates engage in five hours clinical experience: one hour observation in a preschool setting, and four hours observing a child.

This course presents a study of the guiding theories (historical, philosophical, and social perspectives) of early childhood education. Students are exposed to the values, ethical and legal issues, and debates relating to Early Childhood Education, and the importance of becoming an advocate for children and families. It introduces developmentally appropriate practices, its core considerations and its five areas of practice. As a requirement, candidates conduct a one-hour observation in a pre-school or lower division primary school.

This course encompasses guided observations and participation in preschools and lower division primary classrooms. The student-teachers participate in lesson planning and deliver lessons in the actual EC classroom while developing a professional portfolio. The course also offers an exploration of the roles, responsibilities, and challenges associated with being a teacher of young children. Student teachers will participate in a preparatory seminar/workshop to understand the professional requirements and scheduling for the practicum course. During this practicum, student teachers will be provided opportunities to develop and test relationship building strategies with children, interact with relevant school curricular, select, plan and teach lesson unit, critique observations, give and receive feedback in peer groups, video tape teaching episodes, engage in constant self-analysis, and peer feedback as a way of evaluating individual progress. Student teachers submit weekly journals including documentation of peer group meetings, responses to observations, and receive ongoing interactive feedback to further increase their knowledge and skills in earlychildhood pedagogical practices.  These strategies will help the student teachers to become better competent reflective teachers.

This course introduces the value of family involvement in the educational process of children. It examines the family, school, and community relations from Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Theory perspective and how this triad influence the development of the child. It explores challenges and diversity of today's families. It investigates attitudes and techniques that teachers use to build relationships with families and the community. Furthermore, it includes an overview of parenting styles, family structures, and the effect on rearing practices. Lastly, students will need to plan and implement a parent education program. 

This course is designed as a study of the growth and development of children, specifically from birth to age eight. It examines factors that influence growth and development, and the major developmental theories to explain how growth and development occur, i.e. psycho-social, physical, moral, and cognitive development, including language acquisition theories for young children. Student teachers gain knowledge of the developmental differences that occur throughout these domains to enable them to plan activities for children in the same age range, but at different stages of development. Lastly, it offers a brief introduction of observation, assessment, and documentation of children’s behaviors and learning. As a requirement, candidates engage in five hours clinical experience: one hour observation in a preschool setting, and four hours observing a child.

This course focuses on the conceptual understanding of Mathematics and Science in ECE. Student teachers will develop their knowledge of the teaching and learning of Mathematics and Science in early childhood education, and will emphasize scientific inquiry and the application of scientific concepts and theories. The course highlights the planning, implementation, and assessment of developmentally appropriate and integrated math and science curricula that include appropriate materials and learning experiences. Mathematics topics include content (number and operations, algebra, geometry, measurement, and data analysis and probability), processes (problem solving, reasoning, communicating, connecting, and representing), environment and materials, and child-centered choices through discovery and play. It also analyzes the concepts, inquiry skills, scientific procedures, and scientific ideas used in the early childhood science classroom. As a requirement, candidates participate in a four-hour clinical experience. They conduct a one-hour observation, and then prepare a lesson plan for three whole-group interactions with children in a preschool or lower division of a primary school setting.

This course focuses on the literacy development of children from three to eight years of age. It provides an examination of young children's emergent reading and writing skills: Phonological awareness, comprehension, print awareness, and alphabet knowledge (letter identification and letter-sound knowledge). Topics also include: Visual discrimination skills, environmental print knowledge, relationship between spoken and written language, fine motor skills, awareness of the purposes and functions of written words, letter and word writing, and the awareness of conventions of spelling, grammar, syntax, and punctuation. It explores the principles, methods, and materials for teaching literacy through a play-based, inclusive, and integrated curriculum. As a requirement, candidates participate in a four-hour clinical experience. They conduct a one-hour observation, and then prepare and implement lesson plans for four whole-group interactions with children in a preschool or lower division of a primary school setting.

This course introduces the world of children's literature through the reading of various classics and contemporary children's books. If offers literature appropriate for the integration of the curriculum and the children's ages and levels. It then provides creative instructional strategies for developing children's engagement with literary texts, children’s understanding of the diverse cultures and traditions, and children's knowledge of text structures. As a requirement, candidates participate in a four- hour clinical experience. They serve as "reading buddies" preparing and implementing lesson plans with appropriate and creative reading instructional strategies for four whole-group interactions with children in a preschool or lower division of a primary school setting.

This course gives an overview of the developmentally appropriate and culturally responsive guidance research-based strategies to promote all young children's prosocial behaviors. Some of the strategies to include are: cooperation, problem-solving, conflict resolution skills, and family involvement in the guidance process. Candidates design and implement a child guidance management plan. As a requirement, candidates participate in a five-hour clinical experience. They conduct a one-hour observation, and then prepare a lesson plan for four whole-group interactions with children in a preschool or lower division of a primary school setting.

This course identifies the characteristics of exceptional children, the effects of their exceptionality on the developmental domains, and an understanding of the implications of teaching this population of students. Exceptionalities to study include: learning disabilities, ADHD, emotional and behavior disorders, intellectual and developmental disabilities, speech and language disorders, autism spectrum disorder, deafness and hearing loss, visual impairments, other health impairments, comorbidity, and gifted and talented children. The course includes strategies to build relationships with families and Belizean organizations such as the National Resource Center for Inclusive Education (NaRCIE) and the Belize Council for the Visually Impaired (BCVI). It also offers an introduction to the Universal Instructional Design approach. As a requirement, candidates participate in a two-hour clinical experience. They conduct a one- hour observation and then prepare and implement a lesson plan for a whole-group interaction with children in a school for exceptional children setting.

This course emphasizes the methodology and techniques, including developmentally appropriate planning, implementation, and assessment of social studies instruction in the early childhood classroom. It encompasses the integration of social studies across the curriculum and the design of social studies indoor and outdoor environments. Candidates learn about the importance of social systems and social concepts as part of children's understanding of their world. As a requirement, candidates participate in a four-hour clinical experience. They conduct a one-hour observation, and then prepare a lesson plan for three whole-group interactions with children in a preschool or lower division of a primary school setting.

This course fosters an emphasis on the creative development of young children, specifically on the importance of play as an instructional strategy and instruction in the arts such as music and movement, visual arts, and drama. It also focuses on the integration of the arts into the early childhood curriculum developing candidate’s knowledge and skills to plan and implement developmentally appropriate art experiences. For the visual arts aspect of the course, candidates work with various types of materials to create their own teaching-learning resources and to use with young children. As a requirement, candidates engage in a four-hour clinicalexperience. They conduct a one-hour observation and then prepare a lesson plan for three whole-group interactions with children in a preschool or lower division of a primary school setting.

 

This course encompasses guided observations and participation in preschools and lower division primary classrooms. The student-teachers participate in lesson planning and deliver lessons in the actual EC classroom while developing a professional portfolio. The course also offers an exploration of the roles, responsibilities, and challenges associated with being a teacher of young children. Student teachers will participate in a preparatory seminar/workshop to understand the professional requirements and scheduling for the practicum course. During this practicum, student teachers will be provided opportunities to develop and test relationship building strategies with children, interact with relevant school curricular, select, plan and teach lesson unit, critique observations, give and receive feedback in peer groups, video tape teaching episodes, engage in constant self-analysis, and peer feedback as a way of evaluating individual progress. Student teachers submit weekly journals including documentation of peer group meetings, responses to observations, and receive ongoing interactive feedback to further increase their knowledge and skills in earlychildhood pedagogical practices.  These strategies will help the student teachers to become better competent reflective teachers.

Language Development in Early Years (8-week course, fully online – 1 st bi-term) Dr.
Jeffrey Herron & Dr. Ellen Hamilton-Ford

Health, Safety, and Nutrition of the Young Child (8-week course; fully online – 2 nd bi-
term) Ms. Linda Wood

ECE 190:Assessment and Evaluation (16-week course; face-to-face mid-term of semester) Dr.
Sharon Hundley & Ms. Rita Curtis

Implementing the ECE Curriculum

(16-week course; face-to-face mid-term of
semester) – Dr. Sharon Hundley & Ms. Rita Curtis

This course is designed as a study of the growth and development of children, specifically from birth to age eight. It examines factors that influence growth and development, and the major developmental theories to explain how growth and development occur, i.e. psycho-social, physical, moral, and cognitive development, including language acquisition theories for young children. Student teachers gain knowledge of the developmental differences that occur throughout these domains to enable them to plan activities for children in the same age range, but at different stages of development. Lastly, it offers a brief introduction of observation, assessment, and documentation of children’s behaviors and learning. As a requirement, candidates engage in five hours clinical experience: one hour observation in a preschool setting, and four hours observing a child.

This course presents a study of the guiding theories (historical, philosophical, and social perspectives) of early childhood education. Students are exposed to the values, ethical and legal issues, and debates relating to Early Childhood Education, and the importance of becoming an advocate for children and families. It introduces developmentally appropriate practices, its core considerations and its five areas of practice. As a requirement, candidates conduct a one-hour observation in a pre-school or lower division primary school.

This course presents a study of the guiding theories (historical, philosophical, and social perspectives) of early childhood education. Students are exposed to the values, ethical and legal issues, and debates relating to Early Childhood Education, and the importance of becoming an advocate for children and families. It introduces developmentally appropriate practices, its core considerations and its five areas of practice. As a requirement, candidates conduct a one-hour observation in a pre-school or lower division primary school.

This course is designed as a study of the growth and development of children, specifically from birth to age eight. It examines factors that influence growth and development, and the major developmental theories to explain how growth and development occur, i.e. psycho-social, physical, moral, and cognitive development, including language acquisition theories for young children. Student teachers gain knowledge of the developmental differences that occur throughout these domains to enable them to plan activities for children in the same age range, but at different stages of development. Lastly, it offers a brief introduction of observation, assessment, and documentation of children’s behaviors and learning. As a requirement, candidates engage in five hours clinical experience: one hour observation in a preschool setting, and four hours observing a child.

This course introduces student teachers to the early childhood curriculum. It focuses on the daycare, preschool, and lower primary school curricula, and emphasizes developmentally appropriate practices in early childhood institutions. The constructivist teaching-learning principles are examined from a holistic perspective; therefore, student teachers gather an understanding of play-based curriculum across the developmental domains and content areas. Planning for appropriate and integrated lessons is an integral part of the course. As a requirement, candidates observe a class and then prepare a detailed lesson plan with developmentally appropriate learning experiences for a whole-group interaction with children in a preschool setting.

This course provides an overview of the importance of assessment for young children. It examines the theory, methods, and practical strategies of observing and documenting youngsters in their environment to determine the effectiveness of planning and instruction in the early childhood curriculum. It reviews data collection using various authentic assessments and assessment methods. Candidates study traditional assessment strategies such as tests and rubrics used in the early primary years. Additionally, they examine methods of evaluating early childhood programs considering the physical and social environments, and the cognitive development of children in their program. As a requirement, candidates observe a class and identify a child. Then, they prepare a detailed lesson plan with developmentally appropriate learning experiences and assessment for a one-on-one interaction with the child in a preschool setting.

This course gives an overview of the developmentally appropriate and culturally responsive guidance research-based strategies to promote all young children's prosocial behaviors. Some of the strategies to include are: cooperation, problem-solving, conflict resolution skills, and family involvement in the guidance process. Candidates design and implement a child guidance management plan. As a requirement, candidates participate in a five-hour clinical experience. They conduct a one-hour observation, and then prepare a lesson plan for four whole-group interactions with children in a preschool or lower division of a primary school setting.

This course introduces the world of children's literature through the reading of various classics and contemporary children's books. If offers literature appropriate for the integration of the curriculum and the children's ages and levels. It then provides creative instructional strategies for developing children's engagement with literary texts, children’s understanding of the diverse cultures and traditions, and children's knowledge of text structures. As a requirement, candidates participate in a four- hour clinical experience. They serve as "reading buddies" preparing and implementing lesson plans with appropriate and creative reading instructional strategies for four whole-group interactions with children in a preschool or lower division of a primary school setting.

This course provides an analysis of evidence-based health, safety, and nutritional practices to ensure children's well-being. It includes information on common diseases and health issues; child abuse and neglect; healthy environments; preventing and responding to emergencies; and planning healthy, safe, and nutritional experiences that are appropriate to the age of the child. It also discusses healthy eating habits, physical activity, and rest as nutritional factors essential for children's development. As a requirement for the course, candidates participate in the Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and First Aid certification.

This course offers a more in-depth study of language development from infancy to age eight. Topics include: language development stages, theories of language acquisition, assessment of language development, English language learners and children with special needs language development, and developmentally appropriate planning to foster effective language development. Additionally, it studies how to foster language development through home and school connections. As a requirement, candidates participate in a three-hour clinical experience. They conduct a one-hour observation, and then prepare a lesson plan for two whole-group interactions with children in a preschool or lower division of a primary school setting.

This course identifies the characteristics of exceptional children, the effects of their exceptionality on the developmental domains, and an understanding of the implications of teaching this population of students. Exceptionalities to study include: learning disabilities, ADHD, emotional and behavior disorders, intellectual and developmental disabilities, speech and language disorders, autism spectrum disorder, deafness and hearing loss, visual impairments, other health impairments, comorbidity, and gifted and talented children. The course includes strategies to build relationships with families and Belizean organizations such as the National Resource Center for Inclusive Education (NaRCIE) and the Belize Council for the Visually Impaired (BCVI). It also offers an introduction to the Universal Instructional Design approach. As a requirement, candidates participate in a two-hour clinical experience. They conduct a one- hour observation and then prepare and implement a lesson plan for a whole-group interaction with children in a school for exceptional children setting.

This course focuses on the literacy development of children from three to eight years of age. It provides an examination of young children's emergent reading and writing skills: Phonological awareness, comprehension, print awareness, and alphabet knowledge (letter identification and letter-sound knowledge). Topics also include: Visual discrimination skills, environmental print knowledge, relationship between spoken and written language, fine motor skills, awareness of the purposes and functions of written words, letter and word writing, and the awareness of conventions of spelling, grammar, syntax, and punctuation. It explores the principles, methods, and materials for teaching literacy through a play-based, inclusive, and integrated curriculum. As a requirement, candidates participate in a four-hour clinical experience. They conduct a one-hour observation, and then prepare and implement lesson plans for four whole-group interactions with children in a preschool or lower division of a primary school setting.

This course focuses on the conceptual understanding of Mathematics and Science in ECE. Student teachers will develop their knowledge of the teaching and learning of Mathematics and Science in early childhood education, and will emphasize scientific inquiry and the application of scientific concepts and theories. The course highlights the planning, implementation, and assessment of developmentally appropriate and integrated math and science curricula that include appropriate materials and learning experiences. Mathematics topics include content (number and operations, algebra, geometry, measurement, and data analysis and probability), processes (problem solving, reasoning, communicating, connecting, and representing), environment and materials, and child-centered choices through discovery and play. It also analyzes the concepts, inquiry skills, scientific procedures, and scientific ideas used in the early childhood science classroom. As a requirement, candidates participate in a four-hour clinical experience. They conduct a one-hour observation, and then prepare a lesson plan for three whole-group interactions with children in a preschool or lower division of a primary school setting.

This course fosters an emphasis on the creative development of young children, specifically on the importance of play as an instructional strategy and instruction in the arts such as music and movement, visual arts, and drama. It also focuses on the integration of the arts into the early childhood curriculum developing candidate’s knowledge and skills to plan and implement developmentally appropriate art experiences. For the visual arts aspect of the course, candidates work with various types of materials to create their own teaching-learning resources and to use with young children. As a requirement, candidates engage in a four-hour clinicalexperience. They conduct a one-hour observation and then prepare a lesson plan for three whole-group interactions with children in a preschool or lower division of a primary school setting.

 

This course emphasizes the methodology and techniques, including developmentally appropriate planning, implementation, and assessment of social studies instruction in the early childhood classroom. It encompasses the integration of social studies across the curriculum and the design of social studies indoor and outdoor environments. Candidates learn about the importance of social systems and social concepts as part of children's understanding of their world. As a requirement, candidates participate in a four-hour clinical experience. They conduct a one-hour observation, and then prepare a lesson plan for three whole-group interactions with children in a preschool or lower division of a primary school setting.

This course encompasses guided observations and participation in preschools and lower division primary classrooms. The student-teachers participate in lesson planning and deliver lessons in the actual EC classroom while developing a professional portfolio. The course also offers an exploration of the roles, responsibilities, and challenges associated with being a teacher of young children. Student teachers will participate in a preparatory seminar/workshop to understand the professional requirements and scheduling for the practicum course. During this practicum, student teachers will be provided opportunities to develop and test relationship building strategies with children, interact with relevant school curricular, select, plan and teach lesson unit, critique observations, give and receive feedback in peer groups, video tape teaching episodes, engage in constant self-analysis, and peer feedback as a way of evaluating individual progress. Student teachers submit weekly journals including documentation of peer group meetings, responses to observations, and receive ongoing interactive feedback to further increase their knowledge and skills in earlychildhood pedagogical practices.  These strategies will help the student teachers to become better competent reflective teachers.

This final course of the Certificate programme will introduce school leaders to the need for decision making to be principled and non-discriminatory, to their role in, (a) school safety, (b) managing resources, (c) managing finances, and (d) advocacy on behalf of their schools and the communities they serve. It will also indicate their need to comply with the institutions that govern the operation of schools - the Constitution of Belize, the Convention on the Rights a Child, the Education Act and other legal instruments, regulations, promulgated by the Ministry of Education, agreements with trade union or other associations that represent the various categories of school staff. Each will be considered in the context of creating Quality Child-friendly Schools throughout Belize.

Ethics, Advocacy, Law and the School Leader is the final course in the Certificate Program in School Leadership. This course will prepare school leaders to apply ethical framework in the decision making process, it will also assist school leaders to be an advocate of their schools by exposing them to the principles of advocacy which is an essential of any school leader: and it will help school leaders to be aware of the Constitution of Belize and how that impacts the policies of a school. Participants will also become familiar with the Education Act and the attendant rules and regulation which are derived from the Act.

Curriculum Development and Delivery is the third course in the sequence of courses in the Certificate Program in School Leadership

As stipulated by the Programme Standards, Instructional Leadership for Successful Teaching and Learning is concentratedon selected aspects of instructional leadership and their relation to enhancing teaching and learning in Quality Child-friendly schools. Specific theories and practices related to learning theories and processes will be discussed through the various modes of instruction. In addition, this course provides an opportunity for school leaders to demonstrate how these concepts and practices can be used to enhance teaching and learning in schools. Ultimately, Instructional Leadership for Successful Teaching and Learning will develop school leaders' professional competencies to improve instruction in their classrooms (Instructional Leadership for Successful Teaching and Learning Course Book 2, p.4).

This Course will focus on selected aspects of leadership and their relation to school leadership and management in Quality, Child-friendly Schools in Belize.. It will cover specific topics such as theories and concepts of leadership and will examine how these concepts may be applied to school settings, used to tackle issues facing school leaders and schools today and strengthen school leaders’ roles and competencies in transforming Belizean schools into quality, child-friendly schools. 

This final course of the Certificate programme will introduce school leaders to the need for decision making to be principled and non-discriminatory, to their role in, (a) school safety, (b) managing resources, (c) managing finances, and (d) advocacy on behalf of their schools and the communities they serve. It will also indicate their need to comply with the institutions that govern the operation of schools - the Constitution of Belize, the Convention on the Rights a Child, the Education Act and other legal instruments, regulations, promulgated by the Ministry of Education, agreements with trade union or other associations that represent the various categories of school staff. Each will be considered in the context of creating Quality Child-friendly Schools throughout Belize.

This Course will focus on selected aspects of organizational and collaborative leadership with specific reference to Quality Child-friendly Schools (QCFS). It will cover the application of QCFS principles on school management, the development of a healthy and supportive learning environment, and using effective networking approaches for inclusion of all stakeholders in the transformation of traditional schools into quality, child-friendly schools.

Congratulations! Welcome to the culminating and most exciting segment of the teacher education program – the internship experience- for the 2023-2024 Academic Year. This semester you will have the experience of being a classroom teacher. The Internship is designed to afford you the opportunity to participate in the teaching–learning process, to impact student learning and to reflect on your teaching practices to improve your planning, teaching and assessment.

This invaluable experience is only possible through collaborative effort of your Dean, Internship Coordinator, Supervisor, Principal and Cooperating/Mentor Teacher.



This is a course setup for facilitating the training of teachers on the usage of Moodle and its features.

In this space teachers will be able to practice their skills before they apply them in their courses.